Role Reversal: Achieving Uncommonly Excellent Results in the Student-Centered Classroom

Role Reversal: Achieving Uncommonly Excellent Results in the Student-Centered Classroom

Role Reversal: Achieving Uncommonly Excellent Results in the Student-Centered Classroom

Role Reversal: Achieving Uncommonly Excellent Results in the Student-Centered Classroom

Synopsis

Want to make your students more responsible for their own learning? Want to create an academic environment in which students thrive and develop a genuine thirst for knowledge? Want to improve your students' standardized test results but avoid a "teach-to-the-test" mentality that throttles creativity and freedom?

In this book, Mark Barnes introduces and outlines the Results Only Learning Environment--a place that embraces the final result of learning rather than the traditional methods for arriving at that result. A results-only classroom is rich with individual and cooperative learning activities that help students demonstrate mastery learning on their own terms, without being constrained by standards and pedagogy.

By embracing results-only learning, you will be able to transform your classroom into a bustling community of learners in which?

• Students collaborate daily on a number of long-term, ongoing projects.

• Students receive constant narrative feedback.

• Yearlong projects target learning outcomes more meaningfully than worksheets, homework, tests, and quizzes.

• Freedom and independence are valued over punitive points, percentages, and letter grades.

• Students manage themselves and all but eliminate the need for traditional classroom management.

Learn how your students can take charge of their own achievement in an enjoyable, project-based, workshop setting that challenges them with real-world learning scenarios--and helps them attain uncommonly excellent results.

Excerpt

Sasha was off to a rough start in her 7th grade year. During the first grading period, she did very little school work. She completed a small part of one major language arts project and did nothing on a second. When she was asked to review material covered on a web-based assessment, so she could retake it and improve her poor score, Sasha did not produce once again. In-class activities were done haphazardly, with little attention to detail. Feedback from her teacher—me—was mostly ignored.

At the end of the grading period, it was time for reflection, selfevaluation, and a final grade. I met with Sasha, as I did with every student, and we discussed her production. When I asked her for her thoughts, she admitted that the results were not what she had hoped for. She gave no excuses. Because the administration at the middle school where I teach mandates that teachers assign quarterly grades, I told Sasha that a formal grade had to go on her report card. This was a fairly new concept for her because there had been no points, percentages, or grades on any activity for the first nine weeks of school in our class.

“Put a grade on your production for Quarter One,” I said. Tears rolled down Sasha’s face, which was a heart-wrenching sight as I hated to see her punished by a grade. Between sobs, her chin resting weakly . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.