Teaching the Brain to Read: Strategies for Improving Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension

Teaching the Brain to Read: Strategies for Improving Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension

Teaching the Brain to Read: Strategies for Improving Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension

Teaching the Brain to Read: Strategies for Improving Fluency, Vocabulary, and Comprehension

Synopsis

Reading comes easily to some students, but many struggle with some part of this complex process that requires many areas of the brain to operate together through an intricate network of neurons.

As a classroom teacher who has also worked as a neurologist, Judy Willis offers a unique perspective on how to help students not only learn the mechanics of reading and comprehension, but also develop a love of reading. She shows the importance of establishing a nonthreatening environment and provides teaching strategies that truly engage students and help them

• Build phonemic awareness

• Manipulate patterns to improve reading skills

• Improve reading fluency

• Combat the stress and anxiety that can inhibit reading fluency

• Increase vocabulary

•Overcome reading difficulties that can interfere with comprehension

By enriching your understanding of how the brain processes language, emotion, and other stimuli, this book will change the way you understand and teach reading skills--and help all your students become successful readers.

Excerpt

In 1990, George Bush signed a proclamation declaring that the upcoming decade would be “The Decade of the Brain.” The proclamation stated that the coming years would “Enhance public awareness of the benefits to be derived from brain research appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.” In fact, the amount of learning-related brain research completed in that decade through neuroimaging exceeded all prior brain imaging studies devoted to educational research. Yet with all the data from that decade and the continued research of the past seven years, the scientific and educational communities have not reached agreement on the best way to teach reading.

What the research has provided is a wealth of information about how the brain responds to the written word, which areas of the brain are most active during the complex processes of reading, and some of the strategies that seem to increase brain activity and efficiency. The most difficult part is to correlate brain scan activity with objective qualitative improvement in reading skill. The educational literature is saturated with reading controversies that sometimes mix fact with opinion or interpret data with biased, propitiatory interpretations. The goal to strive for is objective data from functional brain imaging that objectively correlates with cognitive response to specific reading strategies.

The more information provided from the research about how the brain learns to read better, more efficiently, and with more . . .

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