The Formative Assessment Action Plan: Practical Steps to More Successful Teaching and Learning

The Formative Assessment Action Plan: Practical Steps to More Successful Teaching and Learning

The Formative Assessment Action Plan: Practical Steps to More Successful Teaching and Learning

The Formative Assessment Action Plan: Practical Steps to More Successful Teaching and Learning

Synopsis

Winner of a 2012 Distinguished Achievement Award from the Association of Educational Publishers Join Nancy Frey and Douglas Fisher as they outline a clear-cut, realistic, and rewarding approach to formative assessment. They explain how four discrete steps work in tandem to create a seamless, comprehensive formative assessment system one that has no beginning and no end. This ongoing approach enhances an active give-and-take relationship between teachers and students to promote learning.

Excerpt

“I don’t know how you’re going to learn this, but it’s on the test,” said the professor of a graduate class on neuroanatomy that Doug was taking.

The teacher’s words clearly articulated one perspective about education: Students should study and learn the content assigned to them. Her statement suggested that the teacher’s job is to provide information and the students’ job is to learn it, whatever way they can. When his teacher implied that the responsibility for learning rested solely on the students, Doug’s confidence plummeted. Having looked at intricate pictures of the human brain, Doug was already questioning how he was going to learn this information. Now his teacher was telling him that she, too, didn’t know how he (or any other student in the class) would learn it.

Understand that Doug was highly motivated to learn this content, and understand that his teacher was armed with the latest technology and instructional methods. The teacher was caring and passionate about her subject area, and, further, she had clearly communicated her high expectations at the outset of the course and summarized information weekly. Were these measures enough to ensure that Doug, and the other members of the class, reached high levels of understanding? Simply put, no. Even though high-quality instruction, innovative technology, motivation, high expectations, and passion are . . .

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