Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

Synopsis

Total Participation Techniques presents dozens of ways to engage K 12 students in active learning and allow them to demonstrate the depth of their knowledge and understanding.

Excerpt

Have you ever noticed how teachers react to the type of professional development seminars known as “stand and deliver”? By “stand and deliver,” we certainly don’t mean the Jaime Escalante movie about improving students’ understanding of math. We mean the type of teaching that occurs when presenters stand and deliver long, drawn-out presentations in lecture style. The next time you’re a recipient of this type of presentation, look around and observe your peers. Most likely some of them have their laptops open and are e-mailing, tweeting, or texting friends; others are openly chattering away; and some are quietly heading for another cup of coffee just to maintain their respectful composure. All this goes on while the speaker drones on and on.

Whereas adults have discovered activity-based coping mechanisms, children don’t have that luxury. Although some students will find ways to become actively disengaged, many are respectfully but passively disengaged. Most aren’t allowed to carry cell phones or laptops, and most aren’t allowed to chatter away while in class. Many children have learned to cope by simply following the teacher with their eyes. Often they’re sitting on the periphery of the classroom, looking at the teacher, but in reality they are miles away. They are certainly not actively and cognitively engaged. And unfortunately, too often students choose to respond to the boredom and disengagement by simply dropping out of school entirely. If stand-and-deliver teaching isn’t good enough for our professional development seminars, why would it be good enough for our children?

This book aims to provide an alternative to stand-and-deliver teaching through Total Participation Techniques (Himmele & Himmele, 2009). We hope to provide ways to actively and cognitively engage students in the learning process. We have written this book for teachers, using real classroom examples and a variety of field-tested techniques that can be implemented in your classrooms . . .

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