Transformational Teaching in the Information Age: Making Why and How We Teach Relevant to Students

Transformational Teaching in the Information Age: Making Why and How We Teach Relevant to Students

Transformational Teaching in the Information Age: Making Why and How We Teach Relevant to Students

Transformational Teaching in the Information Age: Making Why and How We Teach Relevant to Students

Synopsis

How can teachers meet the challenges of engaging and educating all students, from those who are gadget-toting and plugged-in to those who are language learners or economically distressed and everyone in between? How can you help students learn what they need to know when the world and all that's in it is changing rapidly? Standards and high-stakes testing haven't answered the call, but you can.

Transformational Teaching in the Information Age explores the power of placing students at the center of teaching and learning. The shift from simply teaching content to focusing on and teaching individual learners allows teachers to inspire students to be independent, imaginative, and responsible learners for life. These teachers are transforming education, lives, and opportunities for their students.

A transformational approach to teaching results in a high-quality education for today's learners. Citing theory, research, practice, and their own experiences in teaching K-18 students, Tom Rosebrough and Ralph Leverett build a convincing case for the primacy of student-teacher relationships in productive classrooms. Knowing students well is critical to teaching to their needs.

Education cannot be just an effort to cover content, pass standardized tests, and achieve adequate yearly progress. To serve the next generation well, it must be about helping each student develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to live a uniquely satisfying life in the face of myriad changes.

Excerpt

To say we live in a fast-paced and changing era is an understatement. The rate at which knowledge is exploding and the ease at which information is accessible are breathtaking. In 1969 the late Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner wrote about change in Teaching as a Subversive Activity using a clock tuned to the rate of communications inventions. They employed the clock as a metaphor of 3,000 years (1 minute = 50 years) to demonstrate how in the past two centuries (last 4 minutes) so much has happened so fast: 11 minutes ago the printing press; 4 minutes ago the locomotive and telegraph; within the last 3 minutes the telephone, photograph, radio, automobile, motion pictures, and airplanes. Television appeared less than 2 minutes ago. Lasers, communications satellites, and computers were invented in the last minute. Within the last 30 seconds, the Internet and the personal computer appear. Within the last 5 seconds have come cell phones, digital technology, biotechnology, smart phones, and more. Before 11 minutes ago on this clock, we would have to return to the invention of writing itself, close to the beginning of recorded time.

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