Keeping the Whole Child Healthy and Safe: Reflections on Best Practices in Learning, Teaching, and Leadership

Keeping the Whole Child Healthy and Safe: Reflections on Best Practices in Learning, Teaching, and Leadership

Keeping the Whole Child Healthy and Safe: Reflections on Best Practices in Learning, Teaching, and Leadership

Keeping the Whole Child Healthy and Safe: Reflections on Best Practices in Learning, Teaching, and Leadership

Synopsis

This book is a collection of articles from Educational Leadership and other ASCD publications that explores what it means to foster health and safety for students. Knowing that what we teach kids today will shape their future well-being, the authors look at the issues from many angles, addressing both physical and mental health and safety. This fourth in a four-book series of e-books on educating the whole child recognizes that although health and safety are not just curriculum topics, they definitely should be formal parts of learning

Excerpt

The 21st century demands a highly skilled, educated work force and citizenry unlike any we have seen before. The global marketplace and economy are a reality. Change and innovation have become the new status quo while too many of our schools, communities, and systems use models designed to prepare young people for life in the middle of the last century. We live in a time that requires our students to be prepared to think both critically and creatively, to evaluate massive amounts of information, solve complex problems, and communicate well, yet our education systems remain committed to time structures, coursework, instructional methods, and assessments designed more than a century ago. A strong foundation in reading, writing, math, and other core subjects is as important as ever, yet insufficient for lifelong success.

These 21st century demands require a new and better way of approaching education policy and practice—a whole child approach to learning, teaching, and community engagement. What if decisions about education policy were made by first asking, “What works best for children?” What if the education, health, housing, public safety, recreation, and business systems within our communities aligned human and capital resources to provide coordinated service to kids and families? What if policymakers at all levels worked with educators, families, and community members to ensure that we as a society meet our social compact to prepare children for their future rather than our past?

The answers push us to redefine what a successful learner is and how we measure success. It is time to put students first, align resources to students’ multiple needs, and advocate for a more balanced approach. A child who enters school in good health, feels safe, and is connected to her school is ready to learn. A student who has at least one adult in school who understands his social and emotional development . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.