The Chickasaw Rancher

The Chickasaw Rancher

The Chickasaw Rancher

The Chickasaw Rancher

Synopsis

First published in 1960, Neil R. Johnson's The Chickasaw Rancher tells the story of Montford T Johnson and the first white settlement of Oklahoma. Abandoned by his father after his mother's death and then left on his own following his grandmother's passing in 1868, Johnson became the owner of a piece of land in the northern part of the Chickasaw Nation in what is now Oklahoma. The book follows Montford T Johnson's family and friends for the next thirty-two years. Neil R. Johnson describes the work, the ranch parties, cattle rustling, gun fights, tornadoes, the run of 1889, the hard deaths of many along the way, and the rise, fall, and revival of the Chickasaw Nation. This revised edition of The Chickasaw Rancher edited by C. Neil Kingsley, Neil R. Johnson's grandson, is the perfect addition to any reader's collection of the history of the American West

Excerpt

The American West continues to captivate the popular fancy, and while this enduring public interest puzzles many social critics, actually an explanation is not too difficult to come by. The West was a savage, dangerous land, and the challenge it hurled to the men who would conquer it was deadly certain and exacting. Survival, ever a clear and constant question, required endurance and initiative, resourcefulness, and above all courage. The very uncertainties of existence induced an admirably reckless daring. The West was an outlet for individualism, a land of strong personalities. And the region produced a coarse nobility, esteemed by contemporaries, and understandably admired in a nauseously secure, tamed age. Devotees of the West are well acquainted with the likes of Charles Goodnight, John Clay, Richard King, and Ab Blocker. The Chickasaw Rancher introduces to the world a worthy confederate for these range aristocrats—Montford Johnson.

The epic of the Chickasaw rancher is based on the memoirs of Montford Johnson and his son Edward. Neil Johnson, grandson of Montford and son of Edward, has fused these parental recollections into a candid, instructive, and exciting narrative.

The Chickasaw Rancher is a multidimensional story, for besides its primary focus—that of supplying a detailed view of ranching in the Chickasaw Nation—it provides a description of life among the Five Civilized Tribes before, during, and after removal to the Indian Territory. The catalyst that provoked these five nations—the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Creeks, and Seminoles—to remarkable advances in the Anglo . . .

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