Becoming God's Children: Religion's Infantilizing Process

Becoming God's Children: Religion's Infantilizing Process

Becoming God's Children: Religion's Infantilizing Process

Becoming God's Children: Religion's Infantilizing Process

Synopsis

M. D. Faber presents a meticulous, unremitting inquiry into the psychological direction from which Christianity derives its power to attract and hold its followers.

Excerpt

What follows is the culmination of an inquiry undertaken some 15 years ago when I found myself drawn to the psychology of religion (mainly the occidental creeds) as well as to the psychology of what was then called the New Age (shamanism, channeling, witchcraft, psychic healing, among others). My journey led to the writing of several books, two of which obliged me to pay close attention to the particulars of Christian doctrine and rite. Although I wasn’t concentrating specifically on Christianity in these works, I was learning a good deal about it. Eventually I realized that I had reached conclusions on the nature of the Christian faith sufficient to guide me, and hopefully the reader, toward a better understanding of the alleged supernatural realm. Permit me to emphasize that my aim here is not to pick on Christianity but to conclude a project on the psychology of religion that turned out to be a central, defining task of my working (or writing) life. Christianity for me discloses fundamental information on the whys and wherefores of the willingness among people everywhere not merely to believe in a supernatural domain but to give the very direction of their lives over to invisible spirits, including above all, for Christians, the Holy Spirit or, as many Christians used to say, the Holy Ghost. I would like to think that the reader keeps in mind as he or she moves through the text both the underlying nature of current Christian theology and the underlying nature of the human animal that invented the world’s supernatural creeds in the first place.

Acknowledgments

I wish to express my gratitude to the staff of the library at the University of California, Irvine, for assisting me in a variety of ways as I strove to complete the project. I want also to thank Jack Rattelman for his many valuable comments on the analysis as it began to take shape in earnest. Finally, I must commend Ms. Jaina Kennedy for her splendid preparation of a manuscript that was not always easy to decipher, and Ms. Diana Marsan for her outstanding editorial assistance.

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