Being-in-Creation: Human Responsibility in an Endangered World

Being-in-Creation: Human Responsibility in an Endangered World

Being-in-Creation: Human Responsibility in an Endangered World

Being-in-Creation: Human Responsibility in an Endangered World

Synopsis

What is the proper relationship between human beings and the more-than-human world? This philosophical question, which underlies vast environmental crises, forces us to investigate the tension between our extraordinary powers, which seem to set us apart from nature, even above it, and our thoroughgoing ordinariness, as revealed by the evolutionary history we share with all life.
The contributors to this volume ask us to consider whether the anxiety of unheimlichkeit, which in one form or another absorbed so much of twentieth-century philosophy, might reveal not our homelessness in the cosmos but a need for a fundamental belongingness and implacement in it.

Excerpt

David Brian Treanor

I come into the presence of still water.
And feel above me the day-blind stars
waiting with their light. For a time
I rest in the grace of the world, and am free.

Wendell Berry, “The Peace
of Wild Things” (1968)

Where Do We Belong?

Philosophers, theologians, poets, and storytellers have all wondered about their place in the universe, about our place—the place of humans—in the wider cosmos or in creation. the very fact that we feel compelled to ask the questions about where we fit and how we belong implies something significant about the human condition: that we don’t fit—or feel we don’t fit—into the wider fabric of the world. We find ourselves suspended, like Ezekiel, between heaven and Earth, challenged to find our way in a world that is both familiar and foreign, one that both fits and chafes.

Indeed, to ask after the “human place in the natural world” is to open certain controversial lines of inquiry. Are humans—and with them human language, culture, technology, and civilization—part of the natural order or distinct from it? If the latter is true, must we posit a human place elsewhere than in the natural world, a sphere . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.