Welfare's End

Welfare's End

Welfare's End

Welfare's End

Synopsis

With her analysis of the 30-year campaign to reform and ultimately to end welfare, Gwendolyn Mink levels a searing indictment of anti-welfare politicians' assault on poor mothers. She charges that the basic elements of the new welfare policy subordinate poor single mothers in a separate system of law. Mink points to the racial, class and gender biases of both liberals and conservatives to explain the odd but sturdy consensus behind welfare reforms that force the poor single mother to relinquish basic rights and compel her to find economic security in work outside the home.

Excerpt

In 1993, as I was completing a book on Progressive Era and New Deal social policy innovations affecting women, Bill Clinton was preparing his plan to end welfare. My historical research and analysis of mother-directed policy had prepared me to tackle contemporary welfare issues, but it was my political despair at President Clinton’s calculated deployment of welfare reform against poor single mothers that spurred me to shift my scholarly attention from the mistakes made by welfare’s early twentieth-century proponents to the outrages perpetrated by its late twentieth-century foes. As this book began to take shape in my mind, the Republicans rode to power in Congress with promises to end welfare even more swiftly and brutally than Bill Clinton had planned. My scholarly and political lives fully fused, I spent much of the next two years battling Republican welfare reform.

As a steering committee member (and later co-chair) of the Women’s Committee of One Hundred, I worked closely and daily with feminist scholars and activists in a campaign to derail the Republican initiative. From the Committee’s founder, Eva Feder Kittay; from my sister co-chairs, Guida West and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.