India and Pakistan: Continued Conflict or Cooperation?

India and Pakistan: Continued Conflict or Cooperation?

India and Pakistan: Continued Conflict or Cooperation?

India and Pakistan: Continued Conflict or Cooperation?

Synopsis

Beginning in 1947, when "India and Pakistan were born to conflict," renowned India scholar Stanley Wolpert provides an authoritative, accessible primer on what is potentially the world's most dangerous crisis. He concisely distills sixty-three years of complex history, tracing the roots of the relationship between these two antagonists, explaining the many attempts to resolve their disputes, and assessing the dominant political leaders. While the tragic Partition left many urgent problems, none has been more difficult than the problem over Kashmir, claimed by both India and Pakistan. This intensely divisive issue has triggered two conventional wars, killed some 100,000 Kashmiris, and almost ignited two nuclear wars since 1998, when both India and Pakistan openly emerged as nuclear-weapon states. In addition to providing a comprehensive perspective on the origin and nature of this urgent conflict, Wolpert examines all the proposed solutions and concludes with a road map for a brighter future for South Asia.

Excerpt

No Asian conflict has proved more deadly, costly, or intrac table than that which continues to divide India and Pakistan over Kashmir. For the past half-century, since I first became aware of this conflict’s potential for regional destruction, I have pondered the alternatives for its resolution. Many wise friends—Indian, Pakistani, American, European, and Australian—have assisted me in understanding the complexity of the conflict.

When I chaired the History Department at UCLA, Rafique A. Khan, a leader of the Kashmiri community in Los Angeles, first urged me to organize an academic conference to explore how to help achieve peace in Kashmir. Prior commitments and obstacles, however, prevented me from launching so ambitious a project until April 2002, when the Ronald W. Burkle Center for International Relations at UCLA agreed to be its sponsor.

That center’s director, Professor Michael Intriligator, cochaired our conference, “Ways to Help Resolve One of the World’s Most Dangerous Conflicts.” We invited scholars and other speakers . . .

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