Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development

Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development

Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development

Mexico: The Struggle for Democratic Development

Synopsis

This engaging book provides a broad and accessible analysis of Mexico's contemporary struggle for democratic development. Now completely revised, it brings up to date issues ranging from electoral reform and accountability to drug trafficking, migration, and NAFTA. It also considers the rapidly changing role of Mexico's mass and elite groups, and its national institutions, including the media, the military, and the Church.

Excerpt

In general, the accounts of Mexican reality written by outside observers—the perspective of the “other”—have been neither better nor worse than those written by Mexicans themselves. They are simply different, and their importance lies precisely in that difference. When the view from the outside has been the combined result of good writing, intelligence, and scholarship, the result has been outstanding, as shown in The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico (1632) by the Spanish soldier Bernal Díaz del Castillo, the Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain (1807–1811) by the Berlin scientist Alexander von Humboldt, Insurgent Mexico (1914) by the North American revolutionary John Reed, or The Politics of Mexican Development (1971) by the Harvard political scientist Roger D. Hansen, to cite only a handful of classics. We now welcome a fresh systematic overview of Mexican reality coming from Daniel C. Levy and Kathleen Bruhn, with the participation of Emilio Zebadúa (who helps highlight Mexican perspectives). Together these three capture a picture of the political process in Mexico at a time when both the country and the regime have been changing dramatically. As a result of the elections of July 2, 2000, Mexican society has peacefully brought an end to the regime born in 1916 out of the Mexican Revolution, and which led to seventy-one uninterrupted years of guaranteed stability through the monopoly of a single party.

This latest change in Mexico is without historical precedent. Ever since the dramatic encounter between the Europeans and the native . . .

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