Recent Catholic Philosophy: The Twentieth Century

Recent Catholic Philosophy: The Twentieth Century

Recent Catholic Philosophy: The Twentieth Century

Recent Catholic Philosophy: The Twentieth Century

Synopsis

Catholic thinkers contributed extensively to philosophy during the Nineteenth-Century. Besides pioneering the revivals of Augustinianism and Thomism, they also helped to initiate such philosophical movements as Romanticism, Traditionalism, Semi-Rationalism, Spiritualism, Ontologism, and Integralism. Unfortunately the exceptional diversity and profoundness of this epoch in Catholic thought has all too often been under appreciated. This book consequently traces the work of sixteen leading Catholic philosophers of the Nineteenth-Century so as to make evident their seminal offerings to philosophy, namely: Chateaubriand, Schlegel, Bautain, Bonald, Hermes, Gunther, Ravaisson-Mollien, Lequier, Rosmini-Serbati, Brownson, Kleutgen, Mercier, Gratry, Blondel, Newman, and Olle-Laprune.

Alan Vincelette is assistant professor of philosophy at St. John's Seminary, Archdiocese of Los Angeles. He has previously contributed articles to Grayling, A.C., ed., Encyclopedia of British Philosophy (Bristol: Thoemmes Continuum, 2006); Oord, Thomas Jay, ed., The Many Facets of Love (Angerton Gardens: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007); Kornberg Greenberg, Yudit, ed., Encyclopedia of Love in World Religions (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2008); and has translated the works of Pierre Rousselot for Marquette University Press.

Excerpt

This work continues the discussion of recent Catholic philosophy begun in Recent Catholic Philosophy: The Nineteenth Century (Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2009), treating Catholic philosophy through the end of the twentieth-century. There have been approximately 3000 Catholic philosophers who made significant contributions to philosophy in the twentieth-century [including around 70 bishops, two popes—Leo XIII (1810–1903) and John Paul II (1920– 2005), and over 130 converts]. Hence a survey of twentieth-century Catholic philosophy cannot be anything but selective.

I have hence chosen those who I think are the 21 most important and representative of the twentieth-century Catholic philosophers in seven major movements [with the percentage in each movement given in brackets]: Phenomenology [6%], Neo-Thomism [52%], Transcendental Thomism [8%], Personalism [4%], Existentialism [11%], Analytic Philosophy [7%], and Postmodernism [4%]—two other common movements in the twentieth-century are Augustinianism [4%] and Idealism, typically Hegelianism [1%]). Interestingly, Thomism— which makes up a combined 60% of twentieth-century Catholic philosophers—is particularly rare in the Continental philosophers born between 1930 and 1960 (except for Spain), even as it has maintained a popularity in America and Britain (and in Continental philosophers born after 1960). I discuss two philosophers in some depth and include a shorter account of one additional figure for each movement (with a focus as before on Western European and North American thought, and also on epistemology, ethics, metaphysics, and the philosophy of religion).

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