A Practical Guide to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

A Practical Guide to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

A Practical Guide to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

A Practical Guide to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Synopsis

A practical guide that introduces readers to key concepts, practice considerations, and techniques for PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder).

Excerpt

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) became recognized as a diagnosis in 1980 in relation to veterans of war but is now related to other instances of trauma where one’s life or that of another close person has been threatened with serious harm or lethality (Simpson, 2012, p. 13). In fact, the most common cause of PTSD is the sudden, unexpected loss of a loved one (Gabbard, 2000, p. 252). Interestingly, it appears that most people do not develop PTSD when faced with even the most horrifying trauma while others suffer from PTSD when faced with trauma relatively low in severity (Gabbard, 2000, p. 253). This is due to predisposing factors. An important consideration to keep in mind is that a person should not be diagnosed as suffering from PTSD merely because she or he has experienced a traumatic event. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) provides clear criteria of this disorder. The definition and criteria for PTSD will be discussed in the next section.

It is also possible for someone to develop PTSD following a physical or sexual assault on a loved one. This could be referred to as secondary PTSD or Secondary Trauma. The symptoms may be the same, thereby permitting a diagnosis of PTSD.

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