Drugging Our Children: How Profiteers Are Pushing Antipsychotics on Our Youngest, and What We Can Do to Stop It

Drugging Our Children: How Profiteers Are Pushing Antipsychotics on Our Youngest, and What We Can Do to Stop It

Drugging Our Children: How Profiteers Are Pushing Antipsychotics on Our Youngest, and What We Can Do to Stop It

Drugging Our Children: How Profiteers Are Pushing Antipsychotics on Our Youngest, and What We Can Do to Stop It

Synopsis

This book exposes the skyrocketing rate of antipsychotic drug prescriptions for children, identifies grave dangers when children's mental health care is driven by market forces, describes effective therapeutic care for children typically prescribed antipsychotics, and explains how to navigate a drug-fueled mental health system.

• A chapter on effective parenting coauthored by a leading parenting expert, Laura Berk

• Contributions by noted medical journalist Robert Whitaker, author of Anatomy of an Epidemic

• Information on legal issues by Harvard-educated lawyer Jim Gottstein

• Insights from former pharmaceutical industry insider, Gwen Olsen

• An examination of community approaches to children's mental health care by internationally known psychologist Stuart Shanker

Excerpt

The field of children’s mental health has recently undergone a disturbing change. Market forces rather than medical research drive the practice of child psychiatry. the profit motive has undermined even the most basic elements of safe and effective care. While giving children multiple psychiatric diagnoses and placing them on questionable polypharmacy regimens has been an accepted practice for some time, the past decade has witnessed an alarming increase in the use of antipsychotics.

A landmark study conducted by Columbia University Professor Mark Olfson and his colleagues cataloged prescription rates of more than a million children covered by private insurance and revealed that since 2001 the number of antipsychotic prescriptions written for toddlers and preschoolers has doubled. They also discovered that in a majority of cases, prescriptions were written to treat conditions for which the use of antipsychotic medication is neither fda (Food and Drug Administration) approved nor justified by research, and mental health assessments were rarely conducted. While antipsychotic drug use among middle-class children has doubled, prescribing rates to low-income children covered by Medicaid have quadrupled. Poor children are also more likely to receive an antipsychotic prescription from a pediatrician with no expertise in psychiatry and to have no recourse to psychotherapy. It is not only unethical but illegal for doctors billing under Medicaid to write off-label drug prescriptions for children and youth. This common practice has been largely ignored by the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.