Consent of the Damned: Ordinary Argentinians in the Dirty War

Consent of the Damned: Ordinary Argentinians in the Dirty War

Consent of the Damned: Ordinary Argentinians in the Dirty War

Consent of the Damned: Ordinary Argentinians in the Dirty War

Synopsis

Under violent military dictatorship, Operation Condor and the Dirty War scarred Argentina from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s, leaving behind a legacy of repression, state terror, and political murder. Even today, the now-democratic Argentine government attempts to repair the damage of these atrocities by making human rights a policy priority.
But what about the other Dirty War, during which Argentine civilians--including indigenous populations--and foreign powers ignored and even abetted the state's vicious crimes against humanity? In this groundbreaking new work, David Sheinin draws on previously classified Argentine government documents, human rights lawsuits, and archived propaganda to illustrate the military-constructed fantasy of bloodshed as a public defense of human rights.
Exploring the reactions of civilians and the international community to the daily carnage, Sheinin unearths how compliance with the dictatorship perpetuated the violence that defined a nation. This new approach to the history of human rights in Argentina will change how we understand dictatorship, democracy, and state terror.

Excerpt

Argentines have not yet begun to contemplate with rigor a set of questions that many around the globe have begun to debate openly and sometimes ferociously. Dictatorship implies violent control from above, but is there a popular component to authoritarian rule? If so, can that support or acceptance be measured? As in France through much of the late twentieth century, in Argentina myths of a democracy-dictatorship binary persist. The belief that democracy is morally good, dictatorship is unabashedly evil, and there can be no middle ground precludes posing or resolving questions related to the possible gray zone of partial support for or partial acceptance of a dictatorship by the Argentine people or even nonconfrontational communication between Argentines and the dictatorship. It has set rigid terms for political discourse and memory making and has created a dominant ideology of the past that isolates those . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.