Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France

Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France

Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France

Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France

Synopsis

This book explores the unintended consequences of compassion in the world of immigration politics. Miriam Ticktin focuses on France and its humanitarian immigration practices to argue that a politics based on care and protection can lead the state to view issues of immigration and asylum through a medical lens. Examining two "regimes of care"--humanitarianism and the movement to stop violence against women--Ticktin asks what it means to permit the sick and sexually violated to cross borders while the impoverished cannot? She demonstrates how in an inhospitable immigration climate, unusual pathologies can become the means to residency papers, making conditions like HIV, cancer, and select experiences of sexual violence into distinct advantages for would-be migrants. Ticktin's analysis also indicts the inequalities forged by global capitalism that drive people to migrate, and the state practices that criminalize the majority of undocumented migrants at the expense of care for the exceptional few.

Excerpt

In January 2000, newspapers reported that fifty-eight undocumented Chinese immigrants were found dead in the cold-storage container of a Dutch truck. The large number of deaths drew particular attention to the issue of migrants crossing borders under extremely dangerous conditions, given the ever more stringent border controls in the new “Fortress Europe.” But this was far from the first story of its kind. Deaths had been reported around ports of entry into Europe at least since the mid1990s—asylum seekers attempting to cross through the Channel Tunnel from France into the United Kingdom, holding on to Eurostar trains from above and below, others drowning en route from North Africa to Spain’s Canary Islands. The overwhelming response to these life and death crossings, however, was the increasing popularity of right-wing, anti-immigrant politicians, from Pim Fortuyn in the Netherlands, to Jörg . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.