The Metaphysics of Religion: Lucian Blaga and Contemporary Philosophy

The Metaphysics of Religion: Lucian Blaga and Contemporary Philosophy

The Metaphysics of Religion: Lucian Blaga and Contemporary Philosophy

The Metaphysics of Religion: Lucian Blaga and Contemporary Philosophy

Synopsis

Lucian Blaga was an early twentieth-century European philosopher whose work was suppressed at the height of his career by the creation of the Romanian Socialist Republic. Blaga's philosophical writings are rich and creative, spanning metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of science, philosophical anthropology, aesthetics, philosophy of culture, philosophy of history, and philosophy of religion. Mircea Eliade wrote that Blaga was the most gifted and critical original thinker in the history of Romanian philosophy. Because of historical circumstances, Blaga's philosophy has not become known outside of his own country, although within Romania it continues to be read and discussed. Were it to become known outside of Romania, Blaga's philosophy could provide interesting contributions to contemporary philosophical discussions. The thesis of this book is that Blaga's philosophy can make valuable contributions to contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. In order to support this thesis, Blaga's philosophical system is explained in detail so that the reader may see how it can be applied to a variety of philosophical issues. philosophy of religion in order to demonstrate that it can contribute to contemporary Anglo-American discussions. Michael S. Jones is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Liberty University.

Excerpt

Lucian blaga was an early- and mid-twentieth-century European philosopher whose work was suppressed at the height of his career by the ascension to power of the Romanian Communist Party and the subsequent creation of the Romanian Popular Republic. Because of historical circumstances, Blaga’s philosophy has not become known outside of his own country, although within Romania it continues to be read and discussed. This is unfortunate, for two reasons: first, because Blaga’s philosophy is a thing of beauty that would be appreciated by many outside of Romania, and second, because Blaga’s philosophy can shed light on issues that are still discussed in philosophy today. Blaga’s philosophy is a powerful, broad, and systematic attempt at accounting for all of human experience. the thesis of this book is that Blaga’s philosophy has contemporary relevance to Anglo-American philosophy.

Two steps are necessary to support this thesis. First, Blaga’s philosophical system must be introduced and explained in sufficient detail as to enable its subsequent application to a variety of philosophical issues. This will be accomplished in the first part of the book, which relates Blaga’s life and work, his philosophy of philosophy, his metaphysical system, his epistemology, his philosophy of culture, and his philosophy of religion. Second, Blaga’s philosophy must be applied to issues discussed in contem-

1. Ioan Ică states that Blaga’s work continues to be fairly influential in Romania, even among young thinkers; Ioan I. Ică, “Filosofia lui Lucian Blaga din perspectivă teologică: Reconsiderarea unei polemici,” in Eonul Blaga: Sntâiul veac, ed. Mircea Borcilă (Bucharest: Editura Albatros, 1997), 383.

2. Mircea Eliade states that Blaga had the courage to create a philosophy that attempted to address all the aspects of systematic philosophy, something that no European philosopher has tried since Hegel; Mircea Eliade, “Convorbiri cu Lucian Blaga,” in Lucian Blaga: Cunoaştere şi creaţie; Culegere de studii, ed. Dumitru Ghişe, Angela Botez, and Victor Botez (Bucharest: Cartea Românească, 1987), 483. (Eliade’s statement about the lack of systematic philosophy after Hegal is open to dispute.) in his entry on Romanian philosophy in the Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Eliade states that Blaga was “The most gifted and critical original thinker” in the history of Romanian philosophy; Mircea Eliade, “Rumanian Philosophy,” in Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. Paul Edwards (New York: Macmillan and the Free Press, 1967), 233–34.

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