Mapping the Fiction of Cristina Fernández Cubas

Mapping the Fiction of Cristina Fernández Cubas

Mapping the Fiction of Cristina Fernández Cubas

Mapping the Fiction of Cristina Fernández Cubas

Synopsis

Cristina Fernandez Cubas is, without question, one of the most important of the Spanish writers who have begun to publish since the end of the Franco dictatorship. Credited with playing a major role in the renaissance of the short story in Spain, she has won national and international acclaim for her fiction. Works by her have been translated into eight languages and have become a staple of university courses on contemporary Peninsular literature. Fernandez Cubas has created a remarkably coherent narrative world, nourished by a core of fundamental concerns. The eleven essays of Mapping the Fiction of Cristina Fernandez Cubas examine the intellectual preoccupations, narrative strategies, and rhetorical devices that distinguish the four volumes of short stories, two novels, the play, and the book of memoirs that she has published to date.

Excerpt

Kathleen M. Glenn and Janet Pérez

CRISTINA FERNÁNDEZ CUBAS IS, WITHOUT QUESTION, ONE OF THE MOST important of the Spanish writers who have begun to publish since the end of the Franco dictatorship. She is credited with playing a major role in the renaissance of the short story in Spain, winning national and international acclaim for her fiction. Works by her have been translated into eight languages and have become a staple of university courses on contemporary Peninsular literature. Fernández Cubas has created a remarkably coherent narrative world, nourished by a core of fundamental concerns. Mario Vargas Llosa recently compared writers to striptease artists and commented that the two differ primarily in that the former exhibit not their secret charms but the demons that torment and obsess them. The present volume exposes both the obsessions and the literary attractions of Fernández Cubas.

If we were to select one text as the perfect introduction to her fiction, that text might well be “Los altillos de Brumal” [The Attics of Brumal]. The toponym Brumal, based on the word bruma [mist, fog], evokes images of the confusion that swirls through her stories and novels, and the word altillo [attic] has special resonance for Fernández Cubas, who lives in an ático or top-floor apartment in Barcelona and has acknowledged a lifelong interest in altillos, which she describes as closed, rather mysterious spaces. Adriana, the narrator and protagonist of “Los altillos de Brumal,” studies to achieve a degree in history to please her mother but is irresistibly drawn to cooking and kitchens. An exceptionally imaginative and adventurous cook, she creates vegetable soups without vegetables and fish fillets without fish, and her call for ancient recipes leads to the arrival of a wonderfully aromatic jar of strawberry jam that, she is convinced, contains neither berries nor sugar. Like a Proustian madeleine, it . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.