The Church, a Demon Lover: A Sartrean Analysis of an Institution

The Church, a Demon Lover: A Sartrean Analysis of an Institution

The Church, a Demon Lover: A Sartrean Analysis of an Institution

The Church, a Demon Lover: A Sartrean Analysis of an Institution

Excerpt

The critique presented in this book, although accomplished through the conceptual apparatus of Jean-Paul Sartre, is not alien to some of the attitudes that permeate the postmodernist Zeitgeist of today’s world. The foundation of this Sartrean analysis of the Roman Catholic Church is, above all, a critique of the structure of domination that belongs to every institution, but particularly to the Roman Church, since its extraordinary longevity causes its institutional characteristics to be more pronounced than those of any other institution in the world. It is the situation of domination that determines the basic praxis of the Church throughout history and, consequently, makes this praxis one of sado-masochism, rather than one of the love that is the message of Jesus Christ in the New Testament.

Another link between the basic thesis of this book and postmodernism is the concern with de-naturalizing some of the accepted features of our culture, such as capitalism and patriarchy. The attempt here is to denaturalize the structure of the Roman Church as it has existed for centuries, to make clear that there is nothing about the structure that is “natural” or God-given and cannot be changed. The point here is that . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.