Dictionary of American Penology

Dictionary of American Penology

Dictionary of American Penology

Dictionary of American Penology

Synopsis

A comprehensive overview of American penology covering practices, historical precedents, ideologies, changing attitudes, system descriptions, and trends in prison management, as well as noteworthy penal literature. The entries are alphabetically arranged in a concise dictionary format and are cross-referenced to clarify the more technical penal terminology. There is a brief description of each state prison system and major components of the federal system are discussed. Entries include administrative structure, components of the adult and juvenile inmate populations in their respective institutions, and operating budgets for an indication of current costs and capital expenditure budgets for furture expansion costs to corrections systems.

The dictionary provides an overview of a broad variety of topics in American penology. Each entry is followed by complete references and cross references to clarify technical terminology of penology. The entries give essential information about the administrative structure, adult and adolescent population in respective institutions, and both operating budgets for current costs and capital budgets for future expansion for interstate comparison. Other entries include program description, ideology, techniques, and a historical perspective of American prisons.

Excerpt

Data for the original edition of Dictionary of American Penology: An Introductory Guide were compiled and written in the mid-1970s, and the finished work appeared in 1979. During the writing of the original, my research showed that trends were not developing exactly as penologists were predicting. Academic penologists taught me, along with other graduate students, that the era of the large fortress prison was at an end. Penologists in the gun towers, as well as those in ivy towers, also believed that community corrections would soon replace long-term incarceration for all but the most violent, dangerous, and asocial inmates. a smaller prison population, with more reliance on community corrections, would allow America to close down those ancient stone dungeons that had achieved such notoriety. They would be replaced by small, new prisons that were architecturally compatible with the treatment ideology that was so much in vogue. the smaller facilities would prevent the inmates from becoming nameless faces lost in the crowd and allow well-trained professional correctional officers to use the institutional time productively to bring about changes in inmate attitudes and to improve their ability to make an honest living on that inevitable day when they were paroled.

Many things happened to alter the blueprint for the future envisioned by those penologists three decades ago. More, not fewer, people were sent to prison each year. the planned increases in the uses of community corrections did occur, but these simply widened the β€œnet” of social control by bringing more people under criminal justice system supervision instead of reducing the then current prison . . .

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