Selling Sex Overseas: Chinese Women and the Realities of Prostitution and Global Sex Trafficking

Selling Sex Overseas: Chinese Women and the Realities of Prostitution and Global Sex Trafficking

Selling Sex Overseas: Chinese Women and the Realities of Prostitution and Global Sex Trafficking

Selling Sex Overseas: Chinese Women and the Realities of Prostitution and Global Sex Trafficking

Synopsis

2013 Outstanding Book Award Winner from the Division of International Criminology, American Society of Criminology

Every year, thousands of Chinese women travel to Asia and the United States in order to engage in commercial sex work. In Selling Sex Overseas, Ko-lin Chin and James Finckenauer challenge the current sex trafficking paradigm that considers all sex workers as victims, or sexual slaves, and as unwilling participants in the world of commercial sex. Bringing to life an on-the-ground portrait of this usually hidden world, Chin and Finckenauer provide a detailed look at all of its participants: sex workers, pimps, agents, mommies, escort agency owners, brothel owners, and drivers. Ultimately, they probe the social, economic, and political organization of prostitution and sex trafficking, contradicting many of the 'moral crusaders' of the human trafficking world.

Excerpt

Within the space of just three years, in different parts of the world, three women were brought to justice for their roles in what has become a high profile form of global crime. There are a number of common threads among these women and their cases. They exemplify in microcosm a host of issues that surround the illicit movement of people around the world. As such, they provide a kind of backdrop for the theme and focus of this book.

Perhaps the best known of the three cases is that of Cheng Chui-ping, or, as she is better known, Sister Ping. Sister Ping was an international human smuggler—in Chinese, a shetou or snakehead. She charged tens of thousands of dollars to assist illegal Chinese emigrants to come to the United States. It was Sister Ping who was one of the masterminds behind the infamous Golden Venture (the name of a smuggling ship) incident in which hundreds of Chinese illegals were unloaded into the ocean off Long Island in 1993—ten of whom drowned after the ship ran aground. Described as the Mother of All Snakeheads, Sister Ping is estimated to have made some $40 million in her two decades of human smuggling. On June 22, 2005 a . . .

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