21st Century Hollywood: Movies in the Era of Transformation

21st Century Hollywood: Movies in the Era of Transformation

21st Century Hollywood: Movies in the Era of Transformation

21st Century Hollywood: Movies in the Era of Transformation

Synopsis

They are shot on high-definition digital cameras--with computer-generated effects added in postproduction--and transmitted to theaters, websites, and video-on-demand networks worldwide. They are viewed on laptop, iPod, and cell phone screens. They are movies in the 21st century--the product of digital technologies that have revolutionized media production, content distribution, and the experience of moviegoing itself.

21st-Century Hollywood introduces readers to these global transformations and describes the decisive roles that Hollywood is playing in determining the digital future for world cinema. It offers clear, concise explanations of a major paradigm shift that continues to reshape our relationship to the moving image. Filled with numerous detailed examples, the book will both educate and entertain film students and movie fans alike.

Excerpt

There can be no doubt that the digitization of the moving image has radically and irrevocably altered the phenomenon that we call the cinema and that the characteristics of this transformation leave open an entirely new field of visual figuration. For those who live and work in the post-filmic era—that is, those who have come to consciousness in the past 20 years—the digital world is an accomplished fact and the dominant medium of visual discourse. Many of our students remark that the liberation of the moving image from the tyranny of the imperfect medium of film is a technical shift that is not only inevitable but also desirable. And this tectonic shift in cinema is only part of the overall digitization of society.

But it is also a tectonic shift in our culture as a whole, something entirely unprecedented in our lifetimes, or even in this century. With the digitization of culture, bookstores and record shops have nearly vanished; it’s so much easier to purchase these totemic artifacts online. Virgin Megastores, which used to span the globe and offered one-stop warehouses of books, CDs, and DVDs (everything from hip hop to classical, with all imaginable styles in between), has all but gone out of business. In San Francisco, in March 2009, the last Virgin Megastore prepared to close down operations. As Greg Sandoval noted at the time . . .

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