Academics in Action! A Model for Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service

Academics in Action! A Model for Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service

Academics in Action! A Model for Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service

Academics in Action! A Model for Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service

Synopsis

The theory, vision, and implementation of a multidisciplinary collaborative approach to social learning
The academy is often described as an ivory tower, isolated from the community surrounding it. Presenting the theory, vision, and implementation of a socially engaged program for the Department of Human and Organizational Development (HOD) in Peabody's College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, Academics in Action! describes a more integrated model wherein students and faculty work with communities, learn from them, and bring to bear findings from theory and research to generate solutions to community problems.
Offering examples of community-engaged theory, scholarship, teaching, and action, Academics in Action! describes the nuanced structures that foster and support their development within a research university. Theory and action span multiple ecological levels from individuals and small groups to organizations and social structures. The communities of engagement range from local neighborhoods and schools to arenas of national policy and international development.
Reflecting the unique perspectives of research faculty, practitioners, and graduate students, Academics in Action! documents a specific philosophy of education that fosters and supports engagement; the potentially transformative nature of academic work for students, faculty, and the broader society; and some of the implications and challenges of action-oriented efforts in light of dynamics such as income inequality, racism, and global capitalism. This edited volume chronicles teaching, research, and community action that influences both inside and outside the classroom as well as presents dimensions of a participatory model that set such efforts into action.

Excerpt

SANDRA L. BARNES, LAUREN BRINKLEYRUBINSTEIN, BERNADETTE DOYKOS, NINA C. MARTIN, AND ALLISON MCGUIRE

Ideas are worthless except as they pass into actions which rearrange
and reconstruct in some way, be it little or large, the world in which
we live.

—John Dewey, 1929

Town versus gown—publish or perish. The academy is often described as an ivory tower, isolated from the community around it. This edited volume describes a more integrated model for the academy wherein students and faculty work with communities, learn from them, and bring to bear findings from theory and research on generating solutions for solving community problems. Because social problems are not the provenance of any one discipline, the model is inherently interdisciplinary, wherein theory and action span multiple ecological levels from individuals and small groups to organizations and social structures. The communities of engagement range from local neighborhoods and schools to arenas of national policy and international development. These forms of engagement require carefully crafted institutional structures and intentionally monitored processes for support. This volume offers examples of community-engaged theory, scholarship, teaching, and action and describes the nuanced structures that foster and support their development within a research university. Examples are drawn from the Department of Human and Organizational Development (HOD) at Vanderbilt University’s

1. From Reason and Teaching by Israel Scheffler (1973). New York: Routledge Press, p. 154.

2. This volume reflects the editorial efforts of a first editor (Sandra L. Barnes) and a team of second editors. The four-person group of second editors (Allison McGuire, Nina C. Martin, Bernadette Doykos, and Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein) made equal contributions toward the completion of this volume.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.