Bound by Conflict: Dilemmas of the Two Sudans

Bound by Conflict: Dilemmas of the Two Sudans

Bound by Conflict: Dilemmas of the Two Sudans

Bound by Conflict: Dilemmas of the Two Sudans

Synopsis

Since its independence on January 1, 1956, Sudan has been at war with itself. Through the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) of 2005, the North--South dimension of the conflict was seemingly resolved by the Independence of the South on July 9, 2011. However, as a result of issues that were not resolved by the CPA, conflicts within the two countries have reignited conflict between them because of allegations of support for each other's rebels.

In Bound by Conflict: Dilemmas of the Two Sudans, Francis M. Deng and Daniel J. Deng critique the tendency to see these conflicts as separate and to seek isolated solutions for them, when, in fact, they are closely intertwined. The
policy implication is that resolving conflicts within the two Sudans is critical to the prospects of achieving peace, security, and stability between them, with the potential of moving them to some form of meaningful association.

Excerpt

In 2010, Francis Deng wrote a brief but comprehensive study, Sudan at the Brink: Self- determination and National Unity, which outlined the past, present, and prospective future of conflict in the country, united or divided. A referendum was to be held in the South in January 2011 to determine whether the country would remain united or be partitioned by Southern in de pen dence. I provided a Foreword, which I was pleased to do, especially as I had known Francis since the early 1960s when I was in the Sudan as a young physician, and we later grew closer together and cooperated on a number of books and other activities. The book, published by Fordham University Press, as part of its International Humanitarian Series, was immediately translated into Arabic, German, and French and available in electronic form, in order that it have the most broad contribution on the rapidly evolving national debate.

The referendum in South Sudan was only a few months away. And yet, while anticipating that the South would predictably vote for in depen dence, there were international apprehensions about Southern in depen dence. Francis Deng himself entertained a faint hope that unity within the framework of a New Sudan of full equality, without discrimination on the base of race, ethnicity, religion, culture, or gender, might still be possible. I shared the delicate balance between his realistic assessment of the situation, which favored partition, and optimistic aspiration for unity.

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