Caesar's Calendar: Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History

Caesar's Calendar: Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History

Caesar's Calendar: Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History

Caesar's Calendar: Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History

Synopsis

The ancient Romans changed more than the map of the world when they conquered so much of it; they altered the way historical time itself is marked and understood. In this brilliant, erudite, and exhilarating book Denis Feeney investigates time and its contours as described by the ancient Romans, first as Rome positioned itself in relation to Greece and then as it exerted its influence as a major world power. Feeney welcomes the reader into a world where time was movable and changeable and where simply ascertaining a date required a complex and often contentious cultural narrative. In a style that is lucid, fluent, and graceful, he investigates the pertinent systems, including the Roman calendar (which is still our calendar) and its near perfect method of capturing the progress of natural time; the annual rhythm of consular government; the plotting of sacred time onto sacred space; the forging of chronological links to the past; and, above all, the experience of empire, by which the Romans meshed the city state's concept of time with those of the foreigners they encountered to establish a new worldwide web of time. Because this web of time was Greek before the Romans transformed it, the book is also a remarkable study in the cross-cultural interaction between the Greek and Roman worlds.

Feeney's skillful deployment of specialist material is engaging and accessible and ranges from details of the time schemes used by Greeks and Romans to accommodate the Romans' unprecedented rise to world dominance to an edifying discussion of the fixed axis of B.C./A.D., or B.C.E./C.E., and the supposedly objective "dates" implied. He closely examines the most important of the ancient world's time divisions, that between myth and history, and concludes by demonstrating the impact of the reformed calendar on the way the Romans conceived of time's recurrence. Feeney's achievement is nothing less than the reconstruction of the Roman conception of time, which has the additional effect of transforming the way the way the reader inhabits and experiences time.

Excerpt

Time became an obsession for me in more ways than one after I had the honor of being invited to deliver the Sather Lectures. Four years went by between receiving the invitation and arriving in Berkeley in spring 2004, and time’s pressure grew remorselessly all through that period. It accelerated as the years dwindled, and “next year” finally became “this year.” I moved into my office for the semester and began spending most of my waking hours facing out the window, looking at the beautiful Berkeley hills; framed against them was Sather Tower, with its inexorably advancing hands, and its bells tolling out the hours that were being sliced away from my deadline. Soon it was next month, and then next week, and then today, tonight.

Now, my first lecture is twenty-eight months in the past, and I can with a certain degree of tranquillity recollect the very happy semester I enjoyed in Berkeley. Everything you read in the prefaces to books in the Sather series is true: the friendliness and hospitality of the department and the university community are indeed wonderful, the physical surroundings are superb, the conditions for concentrated work are ideal. I owe a great debt of gratitude, first of all, to Robert and Carolyn Knapp. Robert was the perfect chairman, making everything run smoothly, and he and Carolyn made me feel immediately at home with their generous hospitality. The faculty were outstanding collective hosts; I must particularly thank Erich and Joan Gruen, Tony and Monique Long, and Nelly Oliensis and John Shoptaw. Steve Miller coached me on ancient agriculture and astronomy and took me to a . . .

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