American Dictators: Frank Hague, Nucky Johnson, and the Perfection of the Urban Political Machine

American Dictators: Frank Hague, Nucky Johnson, and the Perfection of the Urban Political Machine

American Dictators: Frank Hague, Nucky Johnson, and the Perfection of the Urban Political Machine

American Dictators: Frank Hague, Nucky Johnson, and the Perfection of the Urban Political Machine

Synopsis

One man was tongue-tied and awkward around women, in many ways a mama's boy at heart, although his reputation for thuggery was well earned. The other was a playboy, full of easy charm and ready jokes, his appetite for high living a matter of public record. One man tolerated gangsters and bootleggers as long as they paid their dues to his organization. The other was effectively a gangster himself, so crooked that he hosted a national gathering of America's most ruthless killers. One man never drank alcohol. The other, from all evidence, seldom drank anything else.

A merican Dictators is the dual biography of two of America's greatest political bosses: Frank Hague and Enoch "Nucky" Johnson. Packed with compelling information and written in an informal, sometimes humorous style, the book shows Hague and Johnson at the peak of their power and the strength of their political machines during the years of Prohibition and the Great Depression. Steven Hart compares how both men used their influence to benefit and punish the local citizenry, amass huge personal fortunes, and sometimes collaborate to trounce their enemies.

Similar in their ruthlessness, both men were very different in appearance and temperament. Hague, the mayor of Jersey City, intimidated presidents and wielded unchallenged power for three decades. He never drank and was happily married to his wife for decades. He also allowed gangsters to run bootlegging and illegal gambling operations as long as they paid protection money. Johnson, the political boss of Atlantic City, and the inspiration for the hit HBO series Boardwalk Empire, presided over corruption as well, but for a shorter period of time. He was notorious for his decadent lifestyle. Essentially a gangster himself, Johnson hosted the infamous Atlantic City conference that fostered the growth of organized crime.

Both Hague and Johnson shrewdly integrated otherwise disenfranchised groups into their machines and gave them a stake in political power. Yet each failed to adapt to changing demographics and circumstances. In American Dictators, Hart paints a balanced portrait of their accomplishments and their failures.

Excerpt

Many political machines flourish—and have flourished—in
America, but none has approached the perfection of the Hague
organization in the completeness of its control over the society
in which it exists. Even Tammany Hall, the prototype of all
machine politics, never dominated New York as Hague and his
political associates have dominated Jersey City and Hudson
County. While no political institution can be entirely complete
and successful, the one under examination here so nearly
approaches the most finished machine that can be expected that
others may be measured against it
.

—Dayton David McKean,
The Boss: The Hague Machine in Action

Enoch L. Johnson made a lifetime career out of being a crooked
politician and he did it under a most trying handicap. This
handicap was his inordinate devotion to old brandy, young
girls, and new Cadillacs—three items extremely difficult to keep
hidden from the eyes of even the most supine of electorates.
Enoch, therefore, didn’t bother trying to hide his gaudy pastimes
,

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.