The Federal and State Constitutions, Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the State, Territories, and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America - Vol. 3

The Federal and State Constitutions, Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the State, Territories, and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

The Federal and State Constitutions, Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the State, Territories, and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America - Vol. 3

The Federal and State Constitutions, Colonial Charters, and Other Organic Laws of the State, Territories, and Colonies Now or Heretofore Forming the United States of America - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

TREATY CEDING LOUISIANA 1803

Concluded, April 80, 1803; ratifications exchanged at Washington, October 21, 1803; proclaimed, October 21, 1803

The President of the United States of America, and the First Consul of the French Republic, in the name of the French people, desiring to remove all source of misunderstanding, relative to objects of discussion mentioned in the second and fifth articles of the convention of the 8th Yendémiaire, an 9, (30th September, 1800), relative to the rights claimed by the United States, in virtue of the treaty concluded at Madrid, the 27th of October, 1795, between His Catholic Majesty and the said United States, and willing to strengthen the union and friendship, which at the time of the said convention was happily re-established between the two nations, have respectively named their Plenipotentiaries, to wit: The President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the said States, Robert R. Livingston, Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States, and James Monroe, Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary of the said States, near the Government of the French Republic; and the First Consul, in the name of the French people,

The Lower Mississippi Valley, over which France exercised sovereignty by right of discovery in 1683, was called “The Province of Louisiana,” of which New Orleans was the capital, and was governed by officials sent from Paris, without any charter. Louis XIV granted a monopoly of trade and commerce lor the term of fifteen years to Anthony Crozart . . .

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