Democracy, Culture, Catholicism: Voices from Four Continents

Democracy, Culture, Catholicism: Voices from Four Continents

Democracy, Culture, Catholicism: Voices from Four Continents

Democracy, Culture, Catholicism: Voices from Four Continents

Synopsis

Compiling scholarly essays from a unique three-year Democracy, Culture and Catholicism International Research Project, Democracy, Culture, Catholicism richly articulates the diverse and dynamic interplay of democracy, culture, and Catholicism in the contemporary world. The twenty-five essays from four extremely diverse cultures--those of Indonesia, Lithuania, Peru, and the United States--explore the relationship between democracy and Catholicism from several perspectives, including historical and cultural analysis, political theory and conflict resolution, social movements and Catholic social thought.

Excerpt

Michael J. Schuck

This volume is the result of the Democracy, Culture, and Catholicism International Research Project (DCCIRP), a three-year project led by the Joan and Bill Hank Center for the Catholic Intellectual Heritage at Loyola University Chicago. The twenty-three chapters in this volume explore dynamic relationships between democracy, culture, and Catholicism in the modern world. The volume pays special attention to the shifting interplay between these features of life in four diverse countries: Lithuania, Indonesia, Peru, and the United States. Why explore these three features and why focus on these four countries?

As part of its mission to encourage new scholarship in Catholic studies, the Joan and Bill Hank Center invited scholars in 2010 to participate in research on the relationship between Catholicism and politics. The widespread discussion of Samuel Huntington’s book, The Third Wave: Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century, as well as the Occupy Wall Street movement and the Arab Spring, further suggested the value of narrowing the project’s political focus to the phenomenon of democracy. At the same time, Pope Benedict XVI’s 2009 encyclical Caritas in veritate redoubled the Catholic Church’s longstanding critique of consumer culture and its toxic . . .

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