Washington on the Brazos: Cradle of the Texas Republic

Washington on the Brazos: Cradle of the Texas Republic

Washington on the Brazos: Cradle of the Texas Republic

Washington on the Brazos: Cradle of the Texas Republic

Synopsis

With Washington on the Brazos: Cradle of the Texas Republic, noted historian Richard B. McCaslin recovers the history of an iconic Texas town. The story of the Texas Republic begins and ends at Washington, but the town's history extends much further. It has been a center of political power, a thriving river port, and a haven for freed slaves and German immigrants, but it has also seen its share of hared times. Now Texans know it as the home of Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site, which commemorates the town's role in the Texas Revolution and Texas Republic.

Excerpt

When most people think about Washington-on-the-Brazos, they see a small white frame building close to the Brazos River. That is Independence Hall, where the Texas Declaration of Independence was signed in March 1836. What is missing from most imaginations, and indeed from the present landscape, are the many other buildings that composed the town of Washington then and later. They are as invisible as most of the story of Washington, both before and after the birth of the Republic of Texas. Created like so many Texas towns as a business venture, Washington served as a national capital twice, but it also became a county seat and venue for statewide political conventions. Male residents fought in every war, and many smaller conflicts, that involved Texas, while the ladies of the community were especially involved in supporting the embattled Confederacy. Texans love to talk about steamboats and railroads, and both had a great impact on Washington. Reconstruction looms large in the history of Washington. During the twentieth century, when many small Texas towns faded from the map, Old Washington, as it had become known, did likewise. But fortunately for the town’s legacy, the site became a state park, or historic site, and Washington-on-the-Brazos continues to play a vital role in preserving the memory of the Republic of Texas.

This brief study proceeds chronologically, for the most part, through the history of the community, town, and park presently known as Washington-on-the Brazos. The first chapter focuses on the period before the Convention of 1836 established the Republic of Texas. The second discusses the events of the Republic period, while the third provides an overview of Washington’s commercial boom period, from 1845 to 1855. What follows is a study of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.