A Garland of Feminist Reflections: Forty Years of Religious Exploration

A Garland of Feminist Reflections: Forty Years of Religious Exploration

A Garland of Feminist Reflections: Forty Years of Religious Exploration

A Garland of Feminist Reflections: Forty Years of Religious Exploration

Synopsis

Rita M. Gross has long been acknowledged as a founder in the field of feminist theology. One of the earliest scholars in religious studies to discover how feminism affects that discipline, she is recognized as preeminent in Buddhist feminist theology. The essays in A Garland of Feminist Reflections represent the major aspects of her work and provide an overview of her methodology in women's studies in religion and feminism. The introductory article, written specifically for this volume, summarizes the conclusions Gross has reached about gender and feminism after forty years of searching and exploring, and the autobiography, also written for this volume, narrates how those conclusions were reached. These articles reveal the range of scholarship and reflection found in Rita M. Gross's work and demonstrate how feminist scholars in the 1970s shifted the paradigm away from an androcentric model of humanity and forever changed the way we study religion.

Excerpt

This Garland of Feminist Reflections represents my lifelong concern to live deeply immersed in exploring and understanding questions of ultimate significance. It also represents my lifelong concern with how women have pursued such questions, or have been prevented from pursuing such interests by the prison of gender roles specific to their cultures. the first concern is core and the second is adventitious. Only circumstances forced me, willy-nilly, into lifelong concern with issues of sex and gender. That was not what I intended, and in an ideal world, it would not have been necessary. All these years later, I wish it would have been possible to delve deeply into questions of truth and meaning more abstractly, without so much attention to issues of sex and gender. But, given the world and the academic context into which I, a female, was immersed as a student in the 1960s, only serious, complete ignoring and denial could have permitted me to go about my work and my life pretending that sex and gender were not relevant and determinative.

The “F” WORD: feminism

As a result, throughout my academic and professional life, beginning in graduate school, I have written about and been concerned with women’s religious lives. a significant portion of the 150 articles and essays I have published since 1973, the date of my first published article, have dealt with women and religion in one way or another, and the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.