The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century

The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century

The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century

The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century

Synopsis

A world dominated by America and driven by cheap oil, easy credit, and conspicuous consumption is unraveling before our eyes. In this powerful, deeply humanistic book, Grace Lee Boggs, a legendary figure in the struggle for justice in America, shrewdly assesses the current crisis--political, economical, and environmental--and shows how to create the radical social change we need to confront new realities. A vibrant, inspirational force, Boggs has participated in all of the twentieth century's major social movements--for civil rights, women's rights, workers' rights, and more. She draws from seven decades of activist experience, and a rigorous commitment to critical thinking, to redefine "revolution" for our times. From her home in Detroit, she reveals how hope and creativity are overcoming despair and decay within the most devastated urban communities. Her book is a manifesto for creating alternative modes of work, politics, and human interaction that will collectively constitute the next American Revolution.

Excerpt

Danny Glover

This book is about our journey. It is drawn from Grace’s reflections on her journey, but it is about our journey as well.

When Grace Lee Boggs celebrated her ninety-fourth birthday in the summer of 2009, I knew it was important for me to be there in Detroit with her and those who love her. Ossie Davis, a close friend of Grace and Jimmy Boggs, often said that he went to places where he was invited to speak because he knew that was where he was supposed to be at that moment.

As I traveled outside the United States for seven weeks, I thought repeatedly about coming to Grace’s party. It seemed that every single thing that happened to me in that period of time brought me in close connection to what was going on in Detroit.

In Rwanda I stood at the memorial to genocide among the remains of more than three hundred thousand people buried in a place where you cannot imagine three hundred thousand people even being able to stand. and standing there, I was moved . . .

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