Developmental Coordination Disorder: Hints and Tips for the Activities of Daily Living

Developmental Coordination Disorder: Hints and Tips for the Activities of Daily Living

Developmental Coordination Disorder: Hints and Tips for the Activities of Daily Living

Developmental Coordination Disorder: Hints and Tips for the Activities of Daily Living

Synopsis

Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is a term used to describe children who have difficulty with movement and specific aspects of learning, and includes dyspraxia, Asperger Syndrome and associated conditions. This easy-to-read booklet answers commonly asked questions about DCD and presents all the necessary information to aid parents, carers and professionals in selecting the best options for their child; sometimes correcting the little things can lead to big results.

In clearly laid out chapters, the author describes the features of Developmental Coordination Disorder and provides practical solutions ranging from maintaining posture and personal care through to the more complex tasks of learning. Practical exercises to help improve the DCD child's motor and sensory skills are included, plus an extensive list of useful addresses and resources.

Excerpt

These hints and tips are written for parents and carers of children diagnosed with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). DCD includes dyspraxia, and other associated disorders, such as Asperger Syndrome, Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). There is a lot of overlap amongst these disorders and many such children will have problems with their social skills, motor-planning, attention and concentration, and coordination. Developmental Coordination Disorder is the name given to the condition where children have difficulty with movement and with specific aspects of learning, and where these difficulties are not due to any other known medical condition.

It is estimated that up to 1 in 10 children is affected by DCD. Therefore, every class teacher and many families will have a child with this disorder, from mild to severe, making it a relatively common condition. There is no magic ‘cure’, though the child may improve in some areas with growing maturity and with access to the appropriate therapy to develop skills. However, some children respond more completely to treatment than others.

Even when a child is receiving therapy intervention, and support for learning at school, there are often a number of . . .

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