Autism -- The Eighth Colour of the Rainbow: Learn to Speak Autistic

Autism -- The Eighth Colour of the Rainbow: Learn to Speak Autistic

Autism -- The Eighth Colour of the Rainbow: Learn to Speak Autistic

Autism -- The Eighth Colour of the Rainbow: Learn to Speak Autistic

Synopsis

Through her questioning of traditional approaches regarding autism, and with determination and patience, Florica Stone has been able to develop a satisfying and supportive two-way channel of communication with her once non-verbal and solitary autistic son. In Autism – The Eighth Colour of the Rainbow Florica shows how shared meanings can be learnt and expressed between autistic and non-autistic individuals, though they experience radically different perceptions of reality. Through interacting with and listening to her autistic friends and son, she began to understand the autistic learning style and to decipher the various behavioural needs that arise from their particular sensory processing.

In this inspiring, much-needed guide she presents ways of creating autistic-friendly environments, modifying traditional responses to autistic behaviour and using literal learning, and provides many useful examples and exercises. This book will help parents, teachers and professionals to learn how to interact meaningfully with autistic children, continuously enhance communication and bring about long-lasting changes.

Excerpt

As a distressed parent, I wished I had a book to guide me towards meaningful interaction with my son and to take away some of my worries. I wished for realistic yet hopeful answers to my daunting questions. The absence of such a book triggered the beginning of what turned out to be nine years of self-funded research. This research was designed to find out the meaning of autism, help my son and, if successful, describe to other parents what they can do to help their child. My research required thousands of hours of interaction. It was and continues to be arbitrated by common sense. Its success is validated and monitored by the willingness of the autistic person to interact with me. My own conduct during interaction stems from empathy and aims to inspire bonding through communication.

As soon as the doctor told me that Alexander had autism and that autism cannot be cured (as in curing an illness), I plunged into a deep feeling of hurt and helplessness. Three days later my question ‘Why can it not be cured?’ was answered with ‘Because we don’t know what it is’. I found hope in that answer and decided to challenge the prognosis, not the diagnosis (I was told that there was little that I could do for him and was advised to focus on my normal children).

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