Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 23

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 23

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 23

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 23

Synopsis

MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND, now over twenty years in publication, is an international journal committed to the publication of essays and reviews relevant to drama and theatre history to 1642. MaRDiE 23 features essays by MacDonald P. Jackson on authorship as related to Shakespeare, Kyd, and Arden of Faversham. James Hirsh considers the editing of Hamlet's 'To be, or not to be' in light of both conventional and emerging editorial theory. Politics and prophecy, as they influence Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay is at the centre of Brian Walsh's contribution, while John Curran uses declamation as a rhetorical strategy in order to focus on character in the Fletcher-Massinger plays. Chris Fitter considers vagrancy and 'vestry values' in Shakespeare's As You Like It and June Schlueter reconsiders the matter of theatrical cartography and The View of London from the North. The collection of reviews range from books on early modern dietaries and Shakespeare's plays to those on male friendship and theatre economics.

Excerpt

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England, now over twenty years in publication, is an international journal committed to the publication of essays and reviews relevant to drama and theater history to 1642. MaRDiE 23 features essays by MacDonald P. Jackson on authorship as related to Shakespeare, Kyd, and Arden of Faversham. James Hirsch considers the editing of Hamlet’s “To be, or not to be” in light of both conventional and emerging editorial theory. Politics and prophecy, as they influence Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, is at the center of Brian Walsh’s contribution, while John Curran uses declamation as a rhetorical strategy in order to focus on character in the Fletcher-Massinger plays. Chris Fitter considers vagrancy and “vestry values” in Shakespeare’s As You Like It and June Schlueter reconsiders the matter of theatrical cartography and The View of London from the North. Not least of all, our collection of reviews range from books on early modern dietaries and Shakespeare’s plays to those on male friendship and theater economics.

As ever, the publication of MaRDiE would not be possible without its many contributors and supporters. On this occasion I am pleased to welcome Mary Bly of Fordham University who, joining MarDiE as Associate Editor, will doubtless add her unique blend of wisdom and talent to future volume of this journal.

S. P. cerasano Editor . . .

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