Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 16

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 16

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 16

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 16

Synopsis

Shakespeare and the Book is a lively and learned account of Shakespeare's plays as they were transformed from scripts to be performed into books to be read, and eventually from popular entertainments into the centerpieces of the English literary canon. Kastan examines the motives and activities of Shakespeare's first publishers, the curious eighteenth-century schizophrenia that saw Shakespeare radically modified on stage at the very moment that scholars were working to establish and restore the 'genuine' texts, and the exhilarating possibilities of electronic media for presenting Shakespeare now to new generations of readers. This is an important contribution to Shakespearean textual scholarship, to the history of the early English book trade, and to the theory of drama itself. Shakespeare and the Book persuades its readers of the resiliency of the book itself as a technology and of Shakespeare's own extraordinary resiliency that has been made possible not least by print.

Excerpt

Volume 16 contains several archival studies, with new findings and conclusions about the place of drama in the provinces, the design of the Swan Theatre, and the financing and presentation of an Elizabethan entertainment. One of the essays is devoted to the career of a Jacobean actor. Other contributors focus on, among other things, the function of laughter and blasphemy in the theater, the representation of women in shops on the early modern stage, and the date and the topicality of the Jacobean tragedy The Insatiate Countess.

John pitcher

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