Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 18

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 18

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 18

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 18

Synopsis

Contains essays and studies by critics and cultural historians from both hemispheres as well as substantial reviews of books and essays dealing with medieval and early modern English drama before 1642. This volume addresses the conditions of theatrical ownership and dramatic competitionto those exploring stage movement and theatrical space.

Excerpt

Volume 18 of Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England reflects a wide variety of scholarly interests. These are presented in essays addressing the conditions of theatrical ownership and dramatic competition to those exploring stage movement and theatrical space. Still another piece offers a new critical engagement with the Protestant context of George Peele’s Old Wives Tale. Two further articles, concentrating on medieval drama, probe issues relating to maternal mourning in the Corpus Christi plays and the mapping of the world in the Digby Mary Magdalen. the collection opens with a symposium of three papers—recently revised for this volume—that were originally presented in a session on Christopher Marlowe and theatrical performance that was aired at the Marlowe Society conference at Cambridge University in July 2003.

With the appearance of volume 17 last year, MaRDiE celebrated its twentieth year of publication. With this, volume 18, it has changed editors and book review editors twice. Nevertheless, the journal endeavors to preserve and promote its original goal: to foster conversation concerning medieval and nonShakespearean drama of the Renaissance. Within this framework, MaRDiE strives to further our understanding of medieval and early modern drama; to increase our knowledge of theatrical institutions during the early periods; and to continue the study of the history, theory, and methodology of performance, whether this has been worked out on medieval church porches, or within the walls of the later, professionalized stages such as the Rose, or on our own contemporary stages. in the spirit of the founding editor, two decades ago, the current editor continues to ask for your good wishes in this undertaking and will welcome your counsel.

                                                                            S. P. cerasano                                                                                 Editor . . .

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