Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 19

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 19

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 19

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England - Vol. 19

Synopsis

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England is an international volume published annually. Each volume contains essays and studies by critics and cultural historians from both hemispheres as well as substantial reviews of books and essays dealing with medieval and early modern English drama before 1642. Volume 19 reflects a variety of scholarly interests. The collection opens with two essays - each exploring different aspects of John Webster and James Shirley - that further our understanding of attribution studies. One essay - on the ownership of the Bell Savage Playhouse - showcases MaRDiE's ongoing interest in early playhouses, while another - on Marston's Entertainment at Ashby - addresses performance history. Two further essays discuss issues related to stage costuming. Issues of actual identity are raised in an essay concerning John Lyly's biography, while two other authors probe the complex connections between drama and economics. William Rowley's All Lost by Lust becomes the centerpiece for a reassessment of rape tragedy. S. P. Cerasano is the Edgar W. B. Fairchild Professor of Literature at Colgate University.

Excerpt

The publication of volume 19 of Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England addresses the ongoing interest in attribution studies with two essays that concentrate on the dramatist John Webster. First, Mac Jackson takes up the issue of the authorship of the Melbourne manuscript; then, Charles Forker utilizes material from Webster’s plays in order to test the authorship of an anonymous book of letters entitled A Speedie Poste (1625). Other contributions (Herbert Berry’s essay on the female owner of the Bell Savage Inn, and Matthew Steggle’s note on John Marston’s Entertainment at Ashby) continue the journal’s tradition of presenting new material from the archives. Leah Scragg explores the ways in which biographical fashion alters our understanding of John Lyly’s life. Tom Rutter and Theodora Jankowski discuss issues related to drama and economics. David Nicol extends the critical conversation on William Rowley into the realm of gender politics. Kirk Melnikoff and Loreen Giese attend to the connection between clothing and the drama.

MARDiE continues its custom of publishing review essays in Sarah Beckwith’s “Shakespeare, Crypto-Catholicism, Crypto-criticism,” an exploration of the Shakespeare-in-Lancaster debate. However, readers will notice that we have opened up the format of the journal to include brief reviews, as well as a section for notes, both of which we hope to continue in future volumes.

S. P. CERASANO Editor . . .

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