Education of Syrian Refugee Children: Managing the Crisis in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Education of Syrian Refugee Children: Managing the Crisis in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Education of Syrian Refugee Children: Managing the Crisis in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Education of Syrian Refugee Children: Managing the Crisis in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Synopsis

With four million Syrian refugees as of September 2015, there is urgent need to develop both short-term and long-term approaches to providing education for the children of this population. This report reviews Syrian refugee education for children in the three neighboring countries with the largest population of refugees--Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan--and analyzes four areas: access, management, society, and quality.

Excerpt

There are more people displaced by conflict in the world now than at any point since World War II (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR], 2015c). As of the end of 2014, there were 60 million people displaced by conflict internationally. Twenty million of these are refugees who have crossed state borders; 38 million are internally displaced persons (IDPs) who are displaced within their own countries; and two million are asylum seekers. Half of these displaced people are children (UNHCR, 2014d). Displacement for many is not short-term but rather becomes a long-term way of life; the average duration of refugee situations is 17 years (Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme, 2004).

The Syrian civil war has created one of the largest and most complex humanitarian crises of our time. Since the start of the civil war in 2011 to September 2015, half of Syria’s population of 23 million has been displaced, with at least 7.6 million displaced internally and 4 million refugees (UNHCR, 2015a; UNHCR, 2015d). This makes the Syrian refugees the second-largest refugee population in the world, after the nearly five million Palestinian refugees (Nebehay, 2015).

The Syrian civil war has also created an education crisis for the Middle East. The UNHCR estimates that fewer than half of Syrian refugee children are enrolled in formal education (Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan [3RP], 2015b). A generation of Syrian children is at risk of missing a formal education. Many children have been out of school for years, as schooling in Syria was interrupted and educational systems . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.