Queer Ecologies: Sex, Nature, Politics, Desire

Queer Ecologies: Sex, Nature, Politics, Desire

Queer Ecologies: Sex, Nature, Politics, Desire

Queer Ecologies: Sex, Nature, Politics, Desire

Synopsis

Treating such issues as animal sex, species politics, environmentaljustice, lesbian space and ""gay"" ghettos, AIDS literatures, and queer nationalities, this lively collection asks important questions at the intersections of sexualityand environmental studies. Contributors from a wide range of disciplines present afocused engagement with the critical, philosophical, and political dimensions of sexand nature. These discussions are particularly relevant to current debates in manydisciplines, including environmental studies, queer theory, critical race theory, philosophy, literary criticism, and politics. As a whole, Queer Ecologies stands asa powerful corrective to views that equate ""natural"" with""straight"" while ""queer"" is held to be against nature.

Excerpt

In a now-famous scene from Ang Lee’s Academy Award winning film Brokeback Mountain, 1 characters Ennis Del Mar and Jack Twist have had a bit too much whiskey to drink around the fire at their camp in the Big Horn Mountains of eastern South Dakota and Wyoming, where they are employed by Joe Aguirre in the summer of 1963 to herd and protect his sheep for the grazing season. In the middle of the scene, Ennis drunkenly insists on sleeping outside the tent by the dying fire, but in the middle of the night Jack calls him into the tent and Ennis staggers in. As a brilliant full moon surfs on top of the clouds, Jack reaches over and pulls a sleeping Ennis’s arm around him; Ennis wakes and jolts himself away roughly but Jack pursues him and holds onto his jacket. A long second transpires as Jack looks into Ennis’s eyes and Ennis meets his gaze, understanding. They have fast, fierce sex, and with no time for so much as a postcoital cigarette, the scene abruptly changes to the next morning, Ennis crawling out of the tent with a visible hangover, cocking his rifle, leaving the campsite without conversation. His next words to Jack are later that day. Rifle still in hand, he sits down beside him and says: “That was a one-shot thing we had going on there.” Jack responds: “It’s nobody’s business but ours.” Ennis insists: “You know I ain’t queer.” Jack agrees: “Me, neither.” But that evening, in a warmly lit tent interior, they kiss tenderly and visibly relax into each other’s bodies: they may not be queer, but a rose by any other name apparently smells as sweet.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.