Subordination and Authorship in Early Modern England: The Case of Elizabeth Cavendish Egerton and Her "Loose Papers"

Subordination and Authorship in Early Modern England: The Case of Elizabeth Cavendish Egerton and Her "Loose Papers"

Subordination and Authorship in Early Modern England: The Case of Elizabeth Cavendish Egerton and Her "Loose Papers"

Subordination and Authorship in Early Modern England: The Case of Elizabeth Cavendish Egerton and Her "Loose Papers"

Excerpt

Unlike many manuscript materials by early modern women which have escaped notice altogether, the “Loose Papers” of Elizabeth Egerton, countess of Bridgewater—and therefore the countess herself—have achieved a modicum of historical visibility. Originating, as I will detail below, in the epitaph about the countess composed by her husband John Egerton, the second earl of Bridgewater, this faint historical trace came to be publicized more widely through the scrupulosity of Sir Henry Chauncy, a Hertfordshire antiquarian who was in turn cited by Arthur Collins and by George Ballard. It is Ballard’s unusually nebulous entry in his foundational Memoirs of Severall Ladies of Great Britain on “Elizabeth, Countess of Bridgwater” (for whom he had “searched very carefully, though ineffectually, for some concurrent testimonies of her merit”) that forms the point of entry of the countess into the historical record for the student of early modern women.
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.