The Decline of the Roman Republic - Vol. 3

The Decline of the Roman Republic - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

The Decline of the Roman Republic - Vol. 3

The Decline of the Roman Republic - Vol. 3

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Since the remarks on the Soman method of trying questions of bribery at elections were written (p. 205), a new way of settling these matters has been established in this country. If the new way is not perfect, it is certainly better than the old fashion, and it seems to be generally approved. Our present way of trying bribery questions by a single judge could never have been established at Rome; and perhaps there is no other country in which such an experiment would have succeeded. We have fortunately judges who are placed beyond the influence of those who hold political power, and are also elevated above the necessity of seeking popular favour.

Some persons, who look far into the future, see reasons for fearing that our prospects are not so hopeful as others think that they are, and all of us wish them to be. The best test of the social condition of a country is the possibility or impossibility of correcting political and social evils without violent revolution. Now it seems to us, who look back on the past, very difficult to conceive that any practicable reforms could have cured the political evils of the Roman State in the time of Cicero and Caesar; for the mischief lay among the rich and noble even more than among the poor. The poor had the power in name by virtue of the annual elections . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.