Scots in London in the Eighteenth Century

Scots in London in the Eighteenth Century

Scots in London in the Eighteenth Century

Scots in London in the Eighteenth Century

Synopsis

Studies in Eighteenth-Century Scotland publishes multi-author volumes dedicated to particular themes. Published in association with the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, the series aims to produce lively, interdisciplinary scholarship on a wide variety of topics having to do with the thought and culture (in the widest sense of the term) of eighteenth-century Scotland, including Scottish connections and relations with other parts of the world.

Excerpt

The study of the Scottish diaspora has tended to focus on scots in such distant places as the Americas, India, and Australia. This collection of essays—the ninth in the Studies in Eighteenth Century Scotland series produced by the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society, and the third to be published by Bucknell University Press—seeks to redress the balance by emphasising another, largely neglected wave of eighteenth-century migration, to the new capital of post-Union Britain: London. the volume explores the sheer glamour and “otherness” of London when viewed from Scotland, as well as the enormous opportunities that the metropolis seemed to promise. It also seeks to establish—through art, music, literature, religion, and material culture, as well as through the experiences of a wide range of Scots, from military men and politicians to women and children—both the impact of Scots on London and the impact of London on Scotland. This “internal diaspora” may have involved shorter distances than the more celebrated journeys taken by those who crossed oceans to settle in far-off lands, sometimes by choice and sometimes by force, but it is no less momentous for all that.

This book had its genesis in a conversation in Edinburgh in spring 2004 between Alex Murdoch and Stana Nenadic with their then doctoral student, now colleague, Katherine Glover. Each had noted on several occasions that, despite the oft-cited Scotophobia among the English, eighteenth-century Scots were frequent visitors to London, and many settled there permanently. Yet, surprisingly, the subject had never been explored in depth. Stana Nenadic then organized a workshop at the University of Edinburgh to bring together similarly interested scholars, mostly working in Scotland. About half the articles in this volume (those by Andrew, Aston, Brown, Glover, Nenadic, and Rendall) were originally presented at that workshop in November 2004. Alex Murdoch was the first to suggest that the workshop contained the core of an exciting published volume, and . . .

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