Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien's World

Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien's World

Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien's World

Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien's World

Synopsis

J.R.R. Tolkien is perhaps best known for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, but it is in The Silmarillion that the true-depth of Tolkien's Middle-earth can be understood. The Silmarillion was written before, during and after The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. A collection of stories, it provides information alluded to in Tolkien's better known works and, in doing so, turns The Lord of the Rings into much more than a sequel to The Hobbit, making it instead a continuation of the mythology of Middle-earth.

Excerpt

Since Splintered Light was first published, Owen Barfield has died. At ninety-eight he was not only the last of the Inklings, he was the last link to a generation of thinkers whose ideas provided a countercurrent to the existentialist philosophy that seemed to characterize the twentieth century. the effect of Barfield’s work on the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, and consequently on the present study of Tolkien’s fantasy, would be hard to overestimate. I owe him a great deal, and it is my hope that the republication of Splintered Light, and thus of some of the central tenets of his thought, will in small measure repay my debt.

A great deal of work has been done in Tolkien studies since the present book was first written. of primary importance is Christopher Tolkien’s The History of Middle-earth, an edition with commentary on the entire body of work his father came to call the Silmarillion. This is more than helpful; it is indispensable. Christopher’s contribution to his father’s work and to Tolkien studies is of central importance not just to Tolkien scholars but to all readers of Tolkien’s fiction. the first volume, The Book of Lost Tales, was published in 1984, a year after Splintered Light. Completed in 1996 in twelve volumes, this invaluable series makes available to scholar and general reader alike the length and breadth of Tolkien’s mythology from its beginnings through all its changes and developments, modifications, variations, and competing versions. It shows the range and depth of Tolkien’s imagination and his mythopoeic thought. It shows where The Silmarillion came from and how its rather compressed account of Tolkien’s world relates to the whole. It gives an invaluable picture of how The Lord of the Rings turned inevitably and ineluctably toward the parent myth as the story took shape.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.