Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 37

Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 37

Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 37

Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 37

Excerpt

For over ten years, beginning with Volume XXII in 1996 under the editorial direction of Leeds Barroll, Shakespeare Studies has featured Forums, or scholarly discussions, on issues important to the field of early modern culture. These issues have been wide-ranging, from psychoanalytical theory, to English cosmopolitanism, to racial identities, to Renaissance manuscript studies, to the return of the author; and over time such Forums have helped to focus come of our best scholarly minds on pressing concerns. The Forum in Volume XXXVII, organized and moderated by John H. Astington, takes up yet another such topic, exploring important connections between “The Universities and the Theater,” and featuring contributions by Sarah Knight, Andrew Gurr, Christopher Marlow, and Alan H. Nelson.

As a complement to the Forum, this issue also features an article by S. P. Cerasano, entitled “The Fortune Contract in Reverse” which provides a newly detailed interpretation of the contract’s importance to the theatrical scene. Other articles include David B. Goldstein’s analysis of cannibalism in Titus Andronicus, Martin Orkin on “Speaking Process,” and Clare McManus on “Women and the Early Modern Stage,” which considers several recent publications on this subject.

The seventeen reviews in Volume XXXVII are deliberately wideranging in topic, chronological range, and theoretical approach. For example, Kristen Poole reviews Peter Marshall and Alexandra Walsham’s edition of Angels in the Early Modern World; in accordance with a recent emphasis on medieval antecedents of the Renaissance, Susan Phillips examines Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England, edited by Gordon McMullan and David Matthews; and Christopher Pye comments on Richard Wilson’s Shakespeare in French Theory: King of Shadows. Other books included in this issue focus on such topics as Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, male friendship, Shakespeare and the nature of love, literature and anatomy, the “unfinished business” of cultural materialism, race and performance, and the representation of Elizabeth I in seventeenthcentury England. It gives us special pleasure to include also a review by John Drakakis of a collection of essays in honor of Leeds Barroll, the founder of Shakespeare Studies. This collection, edited by Lena Cowen Orlin, is entitled Center or Margin: Revisions of the English Renaissance in Honor of Leeds Barroll.

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