Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 38

Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 38

Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 38

Shakespeare Studies - Vol. 38

Synopsis

SHAKESPEARE STUDIES is an international volume published every year in hard cover that contains essays and studies by critics and cultural historians from both hemispheres. Although the journal maintains a focus on the theatrical milieu of Shakespeare and his contemporaries, it is also concerned with Britain's intellectual and cultural connections to the continent, its socio-political history, and its place in the emerging globalism of the period. In addition to articles, the journal includes substantial reviews of significant publications dealing with these issues, as well as theoretical studies relevant to scholars of early modern literature. Volume XXXVIII features another in the journal's ongoing series of Forums on an issue of importance to Renaissance studies. Organised and introduced by Greg Colon Semenza, this Forum, 'After Shakespeare and Film', includes the interdisciplinary perspectives of nine contributors on the positioning of Shakespeare studies in digital and other contemporary technologies. The volume also features an article on representing 'blackness' in Shakespearean productions from 1821 to 1844, and another on the influence of 19th-century melodrama on the Shakespeare critical tradition, as well as a review article on 'Shakespeare and the Gothic Strain'. Reviews in this issue address such disparate topics as Shakespeare and the problem of adaptation, Renaissance culture and the rise of the machine, and locating privacy in Tudor England.

Excerpt

Greg Colón Semenza

Our forum, “After Shakespeare on film,” invites leading Shakespeare on film scholars to share some exploratory musings on four basic but hopefully provocative questions: First, what is the future of Shakespeare on celluloid now that the cinema boom provoked by Kenneth Branagh’s Henry V (1989) appears to have run its course? Second, what is the future of Shakespeare and film studies now that a formerly ghettoized subfield has been assimilated—at least halfheartedly—by the scholarly Shakespeare industry? Next, what current and future technologies, if any, are likely to supplant film as the primary vehicle for disseminating Shakespeare within mass culture markets? Finally, how will the alternative technologies discussed in these pages—YouTube, Kindle, Web 2.0, digital cinematography, and so on—impact the scholarly teaching and theorization of Shakespeare’s work and cultural legacy?

As such questions would imply—oscillating as they do between interest in imaginative engagements of Shakespeare on one hand, and critical approaches to them on the other—the respective fates of cinematic Shakespeare and Shakespeare studies depend in many ways on one another. Especially after the so-called Great Recession, levels of support for the humanities in higher education will have much to do with questions about the practicality or real-world applicability of the subjects we study; and let’s face it, no other subfield of Shakespeare studies has done more to locate and theorize the functions of Shakespeare in our world—the world outside of the ivory tower—than Shakespeare on film (and Shakespeare and popular culture) studies. If we are indeed “after” Shakespeare on film, we may also be after Shakespeare, precisely because the popularity, diversity, and marketability of Shakespeare films have advertised for several generations of nonscholars the continuing relevance of the playwright we study and teach. Multi-million-dol-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.