Trusteeship in Change: Toward Tribal Autonomy in Resource Management

Trusteeship in Change: Toward Tribal Autonomy in Resource Management

Trusteeship in Change: Toward Tribal Autonomy in Resource Management

Trusteeship in Change: Toward Tribal Autonomy in Resource Management

Synopsis

rusteeship in Change explores the evolution of Indian Affairs policies and administrative practices regarding the management of trust lands from treaty days to contemporary partnerships. A dozen scholars from diverse fields archaeology, economics, forestry, environmental studies, history, geography, political science, and more review past policies and practices and introduce new ideas and approaches for the future. This book also includes case studies focused on wildlife management, forest preservation, tribal hunting laws, and other specific concerns in management, preservation and utilization of Native American land. An excellent source for scholars in the fields of Native American and environmental studies, Trusteeship in Change is sure to spark debate and to be an important reference book for years to come.

Excerpt

Our association began when Imre Sutton encouraged Richmond L. Clow to write an article for an earlier symposium, published in 1991. After exchanging letters and many phone calls, they charted a path toward a book on the tribes and reservation resource management. We knew it would not be the first attempt to examine Indians and the environment, but we hoped our particular approach and choice of contributors would create a distinctive book, one critical of government and tribal decisions but with a balanced view of the successes and failures in Indian Country resource management. Our critics and readers will determine if we achieved our goal of providing balance, even though we admit to some bias.

Both of us have published in the Indian field—Clow as a historian, Sutton as a geographer. We have tried to put our collective experiences as professors and researchers together in this volume. As a historian, Clow’s interests reflect in part

When in March 1989 I paid a visit to Bittle in Reno, Nevada, where he had retired from his professorship at the University of Oklahoma, I learned that he had permanently abandoned work on his Apache ethnography, an ethnography for which he had taken several sabbaticals to complete. When he said, “In my heart I know they [the Apache field notes] need to get in print, but I simply cannot do it now,” I did not have to guess to what he was referring. His frail frame communicated it all. He was a man in failing health, and now, he acknowledged, his multiple medical problems, which heretofore . . .

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