Soul Snatchers: The Mechanics of Cults

Soul Snatchers: The Mechanics of Cults

Soul Snatchers: The Mechanics of Cults

Soul Snatchers: The Mechanics of Cults

Synopsis

An indispensable book for understanding cults and for helping those who are caught in their snares.--Argus.

Excerpt

The 1990’s witnessed a spectacular and terrifying resurgence of cults.

On March 20, 1995, ten people died and four thousand others required emergency treatment after a Sarin gas attack in a Tokyo subway. Investigations immediately confirmed that the Aum Shinri-kyo cult was involved. Their guru, Shoko Asahara, instigated the incident by a radio broadcast from Vladivostok, using his own radio facilities. In that picturesque Russian city he has several thousand followers, in addition to the five thousand listed in Japan. In his radio speech, Shoko Asahara called upon the faithful to commit collective suicide. “You needn’t grieve, as death approaches;” he said. The poison gas attack is merely a prelude to the “higher level of bliss” recommended by the guru.

Founded in the late Eighties, this cult claims to have a following in Japan of ten thousand, rather than the five thousand estimated by others. It has a strong presence in Russia, where it has benefited from connections with the upper echelons of the State and Army. It is also suspected of having close connections with the Japanese Yakusa and the Russian Mafia. Its guru, who says he found enlightenment during his stay in India, venerates Shiva, the Hindu God of destruction. He asserted that a holocaust would devastate the Earth in 1997. The cult seems to anticipate . . .

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