Understanding Latino Delinquency: The Applicability of Strain Theory by Ethnicity

Understanding Latino Delinquency: The Applicability of Strain Theory by Ethnicity

Understanding Latino Delinquency: The Applicability of Strain Theory by Ethnicity

Understanding Latino Delinquency: The Applicability of Strain Theory by Ethnicity

Synopsis

An applied approach to developing and practicing interpersonal skills.

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The sixth edition includes several new pedagogical tools-such as self-assessment quizzes, exercises, cases, etc.-and information on the importance and usage of social networking.

Excerpt

In criminology and other fields concerned with the study of human behavior, there are varying schools of thought on the generality of theoretical models. On one hand, there are those who believe that theories of behavior apply universally. For example, learning theory focuses primarily on the situational aspects of behavior and is thought to apply universally, since all individuals are influenced in the same way by their environment. At the other end of the spectrum are those who believe that theoretical perspectives are historically and culturally specific. For example, in the study of Mexican Americans in the United States, Chicano social scientists often argue that researchers should move beyond traditional theories to explain Latino delinquency, because those theories fail to consider the Chicano perspective, and were originally generated for White, European males (Blea, 1988; Mirandé, 1987).

The purpose of the current investigation is to explore the middle ground between these extremes to determine whether one general theory of antisocial behavior, traditional strain theory, is universal in its application to ethnic groups, or whether culturally specific models of behavior can inform a theory that has been offered and accepted as a general explanation of deviant behavior. Utilizing multi-ethnic samples from the Denver Youth Survey and the Rochester Youth Development Study, this study will determine whether the traditional strain theory perspective as proposed by Merton (1938) and elaborated by Cloward and Ohlin (1960), applies to Latinos in the same way it does to other ethnic groups.

This investigation follows a recent line of inquiry in criminology which has attempted to incorporate race and ethnicity into theoretical . . .

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