The Bible at Qumran: Text, Shape, and Interpretation

The Bible at Qumran: Text, Shape, and Interpretation

The Bible at Qumran: Text, Shape, and Interpretation

The Bible at Qumran: Text, Shape, and Interpretation

Synopsis

The Bible at Qumran puts the Dead Sea Scrolls to use in exploring two principal themes: the text and shape of the "Bible" at Qumran and the interpretation of these scriptures in this fascinating Jewish community. Written by leading scholars in the field, these informed studies make an important contribution to our understanding of the biblical text at a pivotal period in history.

Excerpt

As the title indicates, the eleven essays that follow have been collected around two principal themes: the text and shape of the “Bible” at Qumran, and the interpretation of these Scriptures by the Qumran community or other ancient Jews. Four of these essays (by J. Bowley, E. Ulrich, J. VanderKam, and R. Wall) were originally presented as papers at the Dead Sea Scrolls Institute of Trinity Western University, and one (by B. Waltke) is reproduced with permission from The New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1997). The remaining essays (by M. Abegg Jr., C. Evans, P. Flint, J. Sanders, and J. Scott) were written by invitation for this volume.

Part 1 is titled THE SCRIPTURES, THE CANON, AND THE SCROLLS, and consists of five essays. In “Canon as Dialogue” James A. Sanders defines canon as a constant dialogue (or discourse) within and outside itself, and as manifested in the intertextuality of the Bible and Qumran literature. He seeks to overcome the dialogical impasse that exists among different religions that worship the one and same God (Christianity, Judaism, Islam) through intertextuality, which serves to enhance our understanding of one another’s religions. In his essay “How We Got the Hebrew Bible: The Text and Canon of the Old Testament,” Bruce K. Waltke provides an overview of Old Testament textual criticism and discusses the divergent interests that exist between textual and literary criticism. He then explores the main sources (the Masoretic Text, the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Septuagint, the Vulgate, and the Dead Sea Scrolls), provides a brief history of their textual transmission, and emphasizes textual criticism as an essential tool for exegesis.

In “The Bible in the Making: The Scriptures Found at Qumran,” Eugene . . .

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